Anti Bullying & Policies

Deshi-Do Martial Arts – Oakleigh Karate & Fitness Centre, is committed to providing a safe and caring environment that fosters respect for others and does not tolerate bullying.

DEFINITION OF BULLYING

  • Bullying is an ongoing act of aggression causing embarrassment, pain or discomfort to another.
  • Elements of bullying include – wanting to hurt someone, acting on this desire, the action is hurtful, an imbalance of power, no reason for the action, is persistent and the bully gets pleasure from hurting the victim.
  • It can be planned and organised or it may be unintentional.
  • Individuals or groups may be involved.

Bullying can take many forms. We consider the following behaviours to be bullying:

Physical

  • hitting, kicking, punching
  • pushing, shoving, spitting
  • making rude gestures
  • taking or damaging something which belongs to someone else
  • forcing others to hand over food, money or something which belongs to them
  • making someone do something they don’t want to

Verbal

  • name calling
  • teasing
  • threatening
  • making fun of someone because of their appearance, physical characteristics or cultural background
  • making fun of someone’s actions

Indirect

  • excluding others from the game or group
  • spreading stories about others
  • spreading untrue stories about others

IF BULLYING OCCURS:

  • we may feel frightened, unsafe, embarrassed, angry or unfairly treated our work, sleep and ability to concentrate may suffer
  • our relationships with our families and friends may be affected and we may feel confused and not know what to do about the problem.

STRATEGIES TO DEAL WITH BULLYING

At Deshi-Do Martial ARTS we will:

  • Openly talk about bullying – what it is, how it affects us and what we can do about it.
  • Teach our children the skills which will build their self-esteem and empower them to take the responsibility for themselves – and give them the opportunity to practise these skills.
  • Implement the policy which clearly states what actions we will take to deal with bullying behaviour.

Responsibilities of staff:

  • be role models in word and action at all times
  • ensure that our dojo management practices support respect for others
  • be observant to signs of distress or suspected incidents of bullying
  • deal with all reported and observed incidences of bullying as set out in this policy
  • ensure that children are supervised at all times;
  • during free time make efforts to remove occasions for bullying by actively patrolling
  • arrive at class on time and move appropriately between lessons including specialist lessons
  • report incidences of bullying to the Sensei Perry Bell if this is warranted

Responsibilities of children:

To ‘tell’ (eg. teacher, staff member) if they are being bullied or if they see someone else being bullied – both at school and on the way to or from school

  • to help someone who is being bullied
  • to not bully others

Responsibilities of parents:

  • to watch for signs that their child may be being bullied eg. unwillingness to attend school, a pattern of headaches, missing equipment, requests for extra money, damaged clothes or bruising
  • to speak to someone on staff at Deshi-Do Martial Arts if their child is being bullied, or they suspect that this is happening
  • to encourage their child to ‘tell’ if they are bullied

REPORTING BULLYING

  • Incidences of bullying can be reported to any teacher, by children and their parents. Any bullying incidences that are dealt with will be recorded and this record will be kept until we evaluate the program.

Procedures for reported incidence of bullying and Steps to be followed upon report of bullying:

  • Incidents of bullying reported
  • Incidents relayed to appropriate person if necessary
  • Appropriate person interviews alleged perpetrator, victim and any bystanders to establish facts

Act of bullying verified:

  • Appropriate person counsels so that person who bullied is aware of the effect on victim
  • Appropriate person ensures the perpetrator acts in a responsible and constructive way to remedy the situation (written or verbal apology also needs to be given)
  • Teacher puts appropriate steps from Behaviour Management Policy in place
  • Teacher and student fill out a Bullying incident form which is sent home for discussion and parent signature
  • Administration files ‘Bullying Incident Form’

Incidence of bullying:

  • Appropriate person notifies parents and an interview time is made
  • Incident is recorded on a ‘Bullying Report”
  • Bullying Report is filed in Administration area

If further incidence of the bullying cycle occurs:

  • Teacher, in collaboration with Sensei Perry, to interview student and their parents
  • Sensei to make clear consequences of repeat occurrence
  • Counselling (on a private basis) is recommended for student who bullied
  • Further action (internal/external suspension, termination of enrolment) is at the prerogative of the Principal and/or School Council.

Act of bullying not verified. Teacher to record incident.

EVALUATION

The frequency or continuation of bullying will be monitored after six months and then after twelve months, alongside the effectiveness of the procedures as stated above. It will be evaluated by:

  • Noting if there has been a reduction in reporting or observed incidences of bullying.
  • Speaking to parents who have reported incidences to find out if the problem has been resolved.

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DESHI-DO MARTIAL ARTS POLICIES

Blood and Body Fluids

The aim of this policy is to decrease the exposure and /or risk to blood-borne and body fluid pathogens1 whilst at training, grading events and / or competitions organized by Deshi-Do Martial Arts & Fitness Centre.

Instructors, officials, and athletes associated with the Deshi-Do Martial Arts & Fitness Centre, are responsible for understanding, implementing and following the abovementioned policy.

The following guidelines must be implemented in all areas of the facility:

When the Instructor is advised, or witnesses an athlete with a bleed, the Instructor will direct that athlete to leave the matted area immediately, if they have not already done so, to seek medical attention.

The athlete’s injury/wound must be treated (no further bleeding) with the affected area completely and securely covered and will only be permitted to return to the mat on advice from the treating qualified Instructor.

The treating qualified Instructor must record the first aid treatment given in a record book or complete an incident form.

If there is any blood on the Gi, clothing, or protective equipment the competitor must change the blooded item immediately. (It is the responsibility of the athlete to ensure they have a replacement Gi and/or clothing and protective equipment.) Under no circumstances should an athlete be allowed on the mat with wet or dry blood stains on their Gi, clothing or any protective equipment.

Blood or body fluids split on the mat or immediate surrounding area must be treated with a bleach and detergent solution2 as outlined in procedures given as Attachment A: Attending to Blood or Body Fluids on Mat or Immediate Area.

A ‘Blood Kit’ is provided at the Centers’ reception area and for competitions/grading, at the officials table. The Blood Kit should be used only for the purpose of dealing with split blood and or body fluid on the mat and or immediate surrounding area. The contents are listed in Attachment B: Blood Kit.

ATTACHMENT A: ATTENDING TO BLOOD OR BODY FLUIDS ON MAT OR IMMEDIATE AREA.

Persons (including Instructors and Officials) attending to blood or body fluids on the mat and or immediate area, must

  1. Take precautions so as not to come into contact with blood or body fluids, wet or dry either on themselves, their clothing or protective equipment. In particular, avoid blood or body fluids reaching the eyes or the areas inside the mouth and nose.
  1. Must designate one person (or people if large spill) to clean the soiled area. In doing so that designated person/s must:
  2. Wear single-use disposable gloves; 2. Use the Spray setting, and being beware of any splash, spray the bleach and detergent solution directly onto the soiled surface, and let soak for 5 minutes; 3. After 5 minutes, wipe the surface with paper towel; and 4. Place all soiled paper towel and gloves in a sealed disposable bag to disposed in an approved manner.
  1. Protective equipment, being the property of the athlete, must be placed in a sealed plastic bag which is returned to the athlete who has the responsibility to wash the items in a normal machine-washing process.
  2. Immediately after every clean up of blood or body fluid, hands including arms to the elbow must be washed with warm water and soap for 1 minute.  This should be performed even if gloves have been worn. Wash all areas that have come into contact with blood.
  1. Under NO circumstances use any material other than paper towel to clean blood or body fluid.

ATTACHMENT B: BLOOD KIT

A ‘Blood Kit’ is provided at the Centre’s reception and for competitions/grading, at the officials table. The Blood Kit should be used only for the purpose of dealing with split blood and or body fluid on the mat and or immediate surrounding area.

A Blood Kit contents include:

–  3 Packets of paper hand towel;

–  2 packets of single use disposable gloves (recommended size medium + large);

–  2 Packets of medium sized plastic bags, with a re-sealable top; and

–  1 x 1000 ml Spray Bottle with solution made up as outlined below

–  Solution for Spray Bottle

–  Make up solution in the spray bottle as follows:

–  0.5mL of bleach, preferably hospital grade

–  2mL of detergent; and

–  97.5mL of water.

The date of preparation should be written on the bottle and should be prepared on the day.

All personnel involved with training/competition/grading must be aware of these guidelines; in particular, of ‘point 4 Attachment A’

BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON THE PREVENTION OF HIV AND VIRAL HEPATITIS:

(Taken from a circular from Dr. Jacques Huguet, President of FIBA Medical Council)

– Some sports carry a greater risk of contamination than others in so far as there is a greater possibility of blood contact.

– Contact can occur through open and bleeding wounds as well as through abrasive or inflammatory injuries to the skin.

– In the field of sports one should know that the AIDS virus cannot be transmitted by saliva, sweat, urine, skin contact, handshakes, bath water, swimming pools, showers or toilets.

– Light washing with detergent or water does not necessarily kill the HIV.

– HIV can survive in dried blood for up to seven days.

– The risk of blood on clothing being transmitted to another player is extremely small, but real.

ABOUT THIS POLICY

This policy was endorsed on the 11 August 2016. It will be reviewed annually and updated accordingly.

1A pathogen is any agent that can cause disease

20.5% bleach and 2% detergent mixed with water and applied for five minutes as outlined in Attachment B

3 Latex can cause skin irritation

Infectious Diseases

The aim of this policy is to decrease the risk of exposure to infectious disease whilst training, competing or partaking in a grading or any other event organized by Deshi-Do Martial Arts & Fitness Centre.

A number of blood-borne infectious diseases can be transmitted during body contact1 and collision sports. The more serious include Viral Hepatitis and HIV (AIDS) infection.

It is important to remember that the more common diseases, such as the “common cold”, flu and herpes simplex may be spread during body contact sports.

It is strongly recommended that the following people be informed of this policy and adopt its recommendations:

Instructors and Officials

Administrators

Athletes and their parents

BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON THE PREVENTION OF VIRAL HEPATITIS AND HIV (AIDS):

(Taken from a circular from Dr. Jacques Huguet, President of FIBA Medical Council)

Some sports carry a greater risk of contamination than others in so far as there is a greater possibility of blood contact.

Blood contact can occur through open and bleeding wounds as well as through abrasive or inflammatory injuries to the skin.

In the field of sports one should know that the AIDS virus cannot be transmitted by saliva, sweat, urine, skin contact, handshakes, bath water, swimming pools, showers or toilets.

Light washing with detergent or water does not necessarily kill the HIV.

HIV can survive in dried blood for up to seven days.

The risk of blood on clothing being transmitted to another player is extremely small, but real.

MINIMISING THE RISK OF VIRAL HEPATITIS AND HIV (AIDS) INFECTIONS

Transmitted diseases like Viral Hepatitis (eg B and C) and HIV (AIDS) may be extremely debilitating and potentially disastrous for the athletes, the team, and associated personnel. These infections may be spread by direct contact with infected blood and other body fluids onto broken skin or mucous membranes.

All open cuts and abrasions must be reported and treated immediately.

INSTRUCTORS

Instructors must report all open cuts and abrasions immediately for first aid attention.

It is recommended that those who officiate in Karate competitions should consider being vaccinated against Hepatitis B.

All contaminated clothing and/or protective equipment must be replaced prior to the athlete resuming any activity.

If bleeding cannot be controlled and the wound securely covered, the athlete will not be permitted to continue.

However, if bleeding should recur, the above procedures must be repeated.

ATHLETES

It is every athlete’s responsibility to maintain strict personal hygiene at all times, in all activities on and off the mat.

It is recommended that all athletes involved in Martial Art disciplines, and playing under adult rules consider being vaccinated against Hepatitis B.

All participants with prior evidence of these infections are strongly advised to obtain confidential advice and clearance from a doctor prior to participating in any activity provided at Deshi-Do Martial Arts & Fitness Centre.

DOJO

It is the responsibility of the Senior Instructor on duty to ensure that the change rooms (including female/male amenities) are clean and tidy. Particular attention should be paid to hand-basins and toilets. Adequate soap, paper hand towels, brooms, waste disposal bins and disinfectants must be available at all times.

The practice of spitting will NOT be permitted.

All clothing, protective equipment or any other equipment and surfaces contaminated by blood must be treated as potentially infectious. Such items must be removed and placed in an appropriate container specific for this purpose which is the responsibility of the athlete.

Contaminated equipment and surfaces must be cleaned immediately as outlined in Blood Rule and Body Fluids Policy (Attachment A), also attached to this policy.

ABOUT THIS POLICY

This policy was endorsed on the 11 August 2016. It will be reviewed annually and updated accordingly.

Although activities provided at Deshi-Do Martial Arts & Fitness Centre do not involve direct contact there is an inherent danger that contact can occur. The word ‘contact’ is used in the event that injury has occurred due to contact.

The Pregnant Participant

The aim of this policy is to reduce the risk of injury to the pregnant participant whilst training, competing attending a grading or any other event organized by Deshi-Do Martial Arts & Fitness Centre.

The main risks to the pregnant athlete are:

direct trauma to the abdomen

joint back injury due to increased ligament laxity

overheating and dehydration

This policy encompasses:

support and guidance to the pregnant participant; and

direction for Instructors at the Centre in assisting the pregnant participant.

Instructors, officials, and athletes associated with BTB Martial Arts & Fitness Centre are responsible for understanding, implementing and following this policy.

THE FOLLOWING GUIDELINES MUST BE IMPLEMENTED:

The pregnant athlete must:

Obtain expert medical advice, and obtain a clear understanding of the risks, particularly in regard with your involvement in Martial Arts before making any decision about whether to continue to participate in their chosen discipline

Obtain medical certificate from doctor stating that “you are able to continue in the sport”;

Work within guidelines of “Exercise and Pregnancy”

Advise your Instructors of your pregnancy

Regularly review the training program with your medical adviser and consider your insurance cover to ensure that it is adequate and relevant;

Should the pregnant athlete decide to continue in the sport she must at all times:

Use common sense and do not take unnecessary risks

Take into account her changes in physical condition

Not to increase the intensity of training

Always work at less than 65 per cent of your maximum heart rate

Watch for any warning signs, such as bleeding or abdominal pain, and see a doctor immediately if these occur

The Instructor must:

Support the pregnant athlete who has decided to continue

Sight the medical certificate from her doctor stating “that she is able to continue in the sport”;

Advise all other assisting Instructors for that session

Modify the program where necessary to:

Avoid unnecessary risks

Take into account the changes in her physical condition

Have her work at less than 65 per cent of maximum heart rate

Allow more frequent drinks and rest periods during training

Should the Instructor become concerned about the athletes’ well-being, the Instructor must raise this concern with the participant with the view as to whether participation continues.

The Instructor must avoid giving advice where they are  not qualified to do so.

Anti-Discrimination and Harassment

The aim of this policy is to prevent discrimination and harassment whilst at participating in any Martial Arts discipline, competition, grading and/or any other event organized by Deshi-Do Martial Arts & Fitness Centre.

Instructors, officials, and athletes associated with Deshi-Do Martial Arts & Fitness Centre, are responsible for understanding, implementing and following this policy.

Where an athlete feels discriminated against or harassed, for whatever reason, they must immediately bring this to the attention of the senior instructor. Should the individual (participant/parent/instructor) not be satisfied with the way the matter is managed at this level or the outcome, the matter must be raised immediately with the Chief Instructor.

It is also against the discrimination law to victimize a person who is involved in making a complaint of discrimination or harassment.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Direct discrimination means treating or proposing to treat someone less favorably than someone else because of a particular characteristic.

Indirect Discrimination means imposing or intending to impose an unreasonable requirement, condition or practice that is the same for everyone, but which has an unequal or disproportionate effect on the individual or group of people.

The characteristics covered by discrimination law across Australia include:

Age, Disability, Family / carer responsibilities, Gender identity/transgender status, Homosexuality and sexual orientation, Irrelevant medical record, Irrelevant criminal record, Favoritism, Political belief/activity, Pregnancy and breastfeeding, Race Religious belief/activity, Favoritism, Sex or gender, Social origin and Education.

Some States and Territories include additional characteristics such as physical features or association with a person with one or more of the characteristics listed above.

EXAMPLES OF DISCRIMINATION

Age: The Centre refuses to allow an older person to teach/train simply because of age.

Breastfeeding: A mother breastfeeding her baby at the Centre is asked to leave.

Disability: A junior participant is overlooked because of mild epilepsy.

Family responsibilities: The Centre decides not to promote an employee because he has a child with a disability even though the employee is the best person for the job.

Favoritism: where a participant is allowed to do additional classes when this has not been offered to others.

Homosexuality: A participant is ostracized from the Centre after telling fellow participants of their sexual orientation.

Marital Status: A participant is deliberately excluded from activities and social functions because of their status.

Pregnancy: A woman is dropped from her squad when becoming pregnant.

Sex: Specialist coaching is only offered to male players in a mixed team.

Harassment is any type of behavior that the other person does not want and that is offensive, abusive, bullying, belittling or threatening. The behavior is unwelcome and of a type that a reasonable person would recognize as being unwelcome and likely to cause the recipient to feel offended, humiliated or intimidated. Harassment may be a single incident or repeated; it may be explicit or implicit, verbal or non-verbal.

Intended or unintended harassment is irrelevant as the focus is on the impact of the behavior.

Unlawful harassment includes the above but is either sexual or targets a person because of their race, sex, pregnancy, marital status, sexual orientation or other characteristic (see characteristic list under discrimination).

The basic rule is if someone else finds it harassing then it could be considered harassment.

Some exceptions to State and Federal anti-discrimination laws apply. Examples include:

Holding a competitive sporting activity for females only who are 12 years of age or over where strength, stamina or physique is relevant; and

Not selecting a participant if the person’s disability means he or she is not reasonably capable of performing the actions reasonably required for that sporting activity.

Requesting, assisting, instructing, inducing or encouraging another person to engage in discrimination or harassment may also be against the law.

It is also against discrimination law to victimize a person who is involved in making a complaint of discrimination or harassment. Example: a player is ostracized by her male coach for complaining about his sexist behavior to another club official or for supporting another player who has made such a complaint.

Public acts of racial hatred which are reasonably likely to offend, insult, humiliate or intimidate are also prohibited. This applies to spectators, participants or any other person who engages in such an act in public. A player is ostracized by her coach for complaining about his racist behavior to another club official.